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Simple Ways To Be A More Compassionate Teacher

The lack of social and emotional skills can lead to burnout. Unfortunately, it’s not easy to develop these
skills. No one taught us these skills when we were kids. We also didn’t know that they’re vital in our adult
life and they can be developed.

Schools are just starting to understand how emotions can affect students’ way of learning and overall well-
being. Thus, students who were lucky enough to have compassionate teachers growing up have been trained
to develop gratitude and compassion. These skills are especially useful in various aspects of their lives.

Because of the importance of the science of emotions to students, teachers must now learn how to be more
compassionate to improve student learning and personal well-being. In a study, researchers found that
teachers with social-emotional competencies will have fewer burnout experiences. The reason for this is that
they work more effectively with students.

These teachers don’t rely on punishment when their students commit wrongdoings. Instead, they recognize
their emotions and find out what caused them. From there, they could respond with compassion each time
students are acting out. This kind of response encourages caring and promotes supportive relationships
between the teachers and students. It can lead to a reduction in student behavior problems and teacher’s
emotional burnout.

But how can you be more compassionate to your students?


Know your students
In one of the best cities for teachers to live, educators here take the time to get to know their students. Not
just their academic achievements but also their personal lives. It’s vital especially if you’re teaching in a
school with students coming from the various socio-economic background.

Keep in mind that teachers who misunderstood the cultural background of their students can affect their
students’ experience while studying. If you spend time visiting their homes and get to know their families,
you’ll develop awareness of their challenges and needs. From there, you can set up a plan on how to help
them.

Ask them what their interests are so you can make your curriculum more relevant to them. It’s a great way to
let them know that you care about them.

Develop self-awareness
Various factors cause our problems. But it’s easy for us to blame others for them. Although there’s truth to
some of them, it’s helpful if you look inward. Try to identify your emotional patterns and find out the
tendencies on how to keep you from being compassionate. From there, you get a boost in fostering your
skills in yourself and others.

If you grew up in a house where your parents are fighting all the time, you’d have a hard time dealing with
your anger. However, as you cultivate self-awareness and you’ll learn how your emotions work, you can
learn how to deal with it more effectively. It’ll result in your relationships with your students and students to
be more positive.

When you develop self-awareness, you’ll learn to recognize when you’re feeling drained. From there, you
can take a step back and practice self-compassion and mindfulness. It’ll also help you in dealing with an
unhealthy situation so that you can step away from it before it eats you up.

Self-awareness allows us to have more control over our emotions. As a teacher, you’ll help your students in
dealing with their anger and frustrations. Even if you’re emotionally dumped, you’ll feel uplifted after
learning how to manage your emotions while learning how to be compassionate with others. You’ll become
the teacher that you’ve wanted to be.

Practice self-love

Self-compassion is the key to become a more compassionate teacher. How can you be kind to others if you
don’t feel it for yourself? When you practice self-love, it can change the behavior that you want to change. In
a study, it showed that people who exercise self-compassion are more likely to improve themselves and help
others for their goals.

Compassionate teachers don’t just keep their gifts to themselves. Instead, they share them with others. True
compassion occurs when you give your wisdom and love to empower another without expecting anything in
return. The gift of kindness is yours to teach another.

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