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Why Tweet: A Personal Journey Through the Twitterverse

Why Tweet, presented as part of Wicks, D., Via, S., & Rhode, J. (2011, January 27). Using Twitter for Teaching, Learning and Professional Development in ...

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Comment by Skip Via on April 3, 2011 at 1:27pm
I think you're on the right track, Barbara. Packing that many students into one place at one time just isn't going to work. Social media tools provide possibilities for delivering instruction asynchronously and disaggregating large classes--or at the very least providing more targeted instruction to those students. In my classes I try to deliver as much instruction online as I can, using the time that I have with my students for more productive discussions, presentations, etc.
Comment by Barbara Chubb on April 3, 2011 at 11:14am
Thanks Skp. In many states we are facing huge budget short falls in ed. I am trying/pondering how we might use social media for future instruction rather than go back to classes of 35-40 students to one teacher because the rest of the science department has been furloughed. I know there is an answer here, still just "twitters" in my mind.
Comment by Skip Via on March 31, 2011 at 11:32am
Thank you, Denise. It's nice to hear that someone else can benefit from my own experiences with Twitter.
Comment by Denise Mathews on March 31, 2011 at 4:20am
My sentiments exactly... This video is just what I needed to get over my hang ups with Twitter.  Thank you for sharing this video.
Comment by Dr. Delaney Kirk on March 13, 2011 at 7:45pm

I'm nodding my head as I watch this video. I too get that look when I tell my colleagues I use Twitter. Thanks-I'll be sharing this on my blog.

Comment by Skip Via on March 1, 2011 at 1:51pm
I couldn't agree more, Don. We've tried the small, incremental approach to professional development and it just doesn't work. There are still many questions about how we move teachers into the enthusiastic adopter and innovator levels. My own opinion is that we probably can't until there are significant changes in the way we do school, from K-12 through post-secondary, from teacher prep through inservice support. Teachers probably won't change much until the system changes, in some fairly monumental ways.
Comment by Don Lourcey on March 1, 2011 at 12:04pm

Skip, thanks for this video. It is obvious that higher ed faces the same struggles that secondary ed faces. Thanks for the thought provoking comments and strategies you mention. I read this quote today from Open Education, "Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants: Teaching the Net Generation" which weighs on this very issue about how we can become more effective teachers who impact and guide learning of our digital natives:

Ultimately, the message is a simple one. Educators, whether they were born prior to’64 or after, will find little classroom success if they remain in the avoider, reluctant adopter, minimalist or tourist categories. There is now great clarity that educators must be at a minimum in the enthusiastic adopter category if they are to successfully teach the digital generation.

 

In fact, we would contend that the best teachers moving forward will need to take their technology to an even higher level. To be successful, they will need, at least at times, to move into the category of user often dubbed innovator.

 

I see Twitter (and Diigo for that matter) as a means (breadth as you reference) to lead and innovate, to enthusiastically infuse technology in the work we do, to grow and create together. Thanks again. Have a great day.

 

Comment by Skip Via on February 26, 2011 at 2:24pm
Thank you for the kind words, Janey. You're right--Twitter can be very difficult to appreciate. It takes some time and commitment on the part of the user, but the rewards are usually worth the effort.
Comment by Janey Nolan on February 26, 2011 at 3:39am
Thank you for posting this. Getting to know how to use twitter can be difficult  - your diagrams showing how our knowledge intercepts is great.

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